Thursday, March 31, 2016

art is bother, so is repairing things. live long and repair!

“Sorry it was so much bother”
“Don’t worry about it, everything I do is bother!”
I like to bother about stuff, that’s my day-job: dream, design, then make. Hundreds of small steps and details to bother about, on the way to something new. Along the way, I repair a lot of my own stuff.

My friend and neighbour is a:
“Please look after my dog”
“Who wants cake and mojito’s?”
- kind of neighbour.
And he broke a favourite belt.

It wasn’t expensive, but it is quite lovely: supple, dark Italian leather, with a cast buckle that delivered all the strain of bending over after a big dinner onto a tiny plate of who-knows-what cast metal that is - was - less than 1mm thick. Poor design.

Why not just buy another belt? Maybe he should have—but it’s the principle… We can mend things, and I could share a little happiness by drilling two holes and swinging a hammer to set 2 fat new rivets through a serious piece of scrap brass—that belt now has 5.7mm of quality metal to take the strain. A quick lick of sand-paper and the belt is ready to party again; I happily succumbed to that intrinsically human need to repair*, and enjoy material until it has truly exhausted it’s lifetime.
Rivets save the day, and the belt. Gotta love a rivet.
Someone undoubtedly has a PhD in understanding this need to bother—and of course art and craft go way beyond function (although this unusual request is now very functional again!).

*repair. The creative in me wants to know why we have let go of repair... Why don't we say "reduce, re-use, repair"? And then - and only then - when it's completely exhausted... recycle? Who agreed that so much poor design and built-in obsolescence was OK? Can we really afford it in the very largest sense?

I'd love to research that (and archeology), because it feels like we have given something up, and I don't know that we ever actually agreed to it. But right now I don't have time (ah, there's the rub...) because I’m already bothering about my next piece of artwork, and that's much, much trickier than this was...

Live long and repair!
If you want some help to try this belt-buckle repair for yourself, please read on to see the rear view of the buckle, and get a very quick description of how to...

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

jewellery meets lego

Jeff de Boer and his apprentice Dylan Puddu have been developing the Gearing collection for a while now, and in 2015, they finally invited me to start playing in the toy-box with them! I must have hinted loudly enough at how cool I think the Gearing components really are… We have lots of plans and new work to come, with one of a kind and stone-set pieces. 

Please contact Jeff if you would like to know more.

Armét-Haus Gearing components become cufflinks... Set with rhodolite garnets.
Custom design by Christine Pedersen.

Armét-Haus Gearing pendant: Jeff de Boer and Dylan Puddu.

Avenue Magazine published a neat article on Jeff's studio and the (slightly over-whelming!) range of projects that he is working on at any one time :)