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narrative jewellery: tales from the toolbox book launch

For every piece of jewellery I make there is a story. It can be simple, just a note on the “why?” that led to the forms and textures, or the feeling that I want to remember.

Sometimes the single idea that could become a piece, conceived way before the act of making, can become so over-whelming that I need to write a whole new reality for the jewellery to exist within. That’s how it was for “Pull”, the first piece of jewellery in a body of work that became the ReFind Collection*. It caused me to look at materials in my home, especially the things that were routinely thrown away, very differently. It was like waking up to realize I just hadn’t been paying the right kind of attention to all the “stuff” in other areas of my life; realizing that maybe jewellery could be linked to something as obscure as industrial-scale food-processing and packaging—if I allowed my mind to receive the information, differently.

I am very honoured that my necklace has been included in Mark Fenn’s new book, Narrative Jewelry: Tales From The Toolbox, to be released on October 28, 2017. There is a website for the book, and all of the contributing artists and their web-sites will be listed there. The book is available for pre-order from Amazon.

Not surprisingly, I can’t wait to read my copy… For all of the reasons that a piece of jewellery becomes special to us—why we fall in love with one thing, but not another, for the stories that we hear from makers, and the stories we will make-up for ourselves, as wearers.

*The ReFind Collection is still under development, and has not yet been shown publicly. I am seeking an appropriate exhibition opportunity that would allow me to present the full installation of source materials, intermediate jewellery forms, and finished work  - please contact me for further details.


Details from the official web-site for the book: 
http://www.narrative-jewellery.com
Narrative Jewelry: Tales from the Toolbox
Author Mark Fenn
Foreword by Jack Cunningham, PhD
Published by Schiffer Publishing

Featuring 450 full-color photos and 241 of the world’s foremost narrative jewelry makers, this book showcases the best of what today's makers, ranging from newly graduated students to the luminaries of the jewelry world, have to offer us: jewelry that's designed to evoke a range of thoughts and feelings. 
Do you have a piece of jewelry that offers a story? 
What story does the jewelry we own or desire tell?
Why are you attracted to some pieces, but repelled by others? 
The answers unfold in this contemporary compendium, also featuring a foreword by jewelry professor and expert Jack Cunningham, PhD, and text by artists Jo Pond and Dauvit Alexander (The Justified Sinner). 
The makers and images selected for this book are a broad representation of the genre of narrative jewelry, and offer a fascinating look for anyone who wears, collects, or has an interest in jewelry or design.

ISBN: 978-0-7643-5414-4
Size: 9" x 12" - 
Illustrations: 450 colour images
Pages: 304
Binding: Hard Cover
Guide Price $60.00 - £46.37 



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